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WarioWare: Get it Together! Review

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WarioWare: Get it Together! Review


Verdict

Trusted Reviews Recommended

Nearly two decades after its first entry, the WarioWare series still knows how to keep things feeling fresh, and the series’ chaotic bombardment of microgames is as addictive as ever. While the experience might not be as rich as say The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild or Super Mario Odyssey, Get it Together! is still tons of fun to play.

Pros

  • Fresh new take on the WarioWare formula
  • The animation is delightful
  • Tons of replayability

Cons

  • Story mode doesn’t amount to much
  • Some characters feel like a hindrance

Key Features


  • PlatformsNintendo Switch

  • DeveloperIntelligent Systems

Introduction

Wario and his microgame loving circle of friends are back in the brilliantly bizarre but no less entertaining WarioWare: Get it Together! on Nintendo Switch.

Some of my favourite gaming memories are easily owed to the WarioWare series. Between absolutely decimating the bottom-screen on my DS with WarioWare: Touched and later flinging my arm’s around like no-one’s business for WarioWare: Smooth Moves on the Wii, the series has always felt like such a rush to play.

With the lacklustre Game & Wario for Wii U however, and the fact that the series’ last entry – WarioWare: Gold – launched on the 3DS long after the console had seen its prime, it’s been a while since I dabbled in some of the frenetic gameplay the series is well-known for.

With Get it Together! launching on a Nintendo home console however, and at just the right time as the Switch is in need of some new first-party titles, I couldn’t wait to dive into the title. Luckily for me (and my expectations), Nintendo hasn’t let me down.

Story and graphics

  • The story takes place inside a rogue video game console
  • The game’s art style has been adapted to suit its digital backdrop
  • Character designs stand out against 2D backgrounds

The WarioWare series has never really been known for its story – after all, how much narrative do you really for a series that revolves around completely out of context microgames? To its credit however, Get it Together! does have more of a narrative than the average WarioWare game, with the series’ cast pulled into a possessed video game console of Wario’s making.

Wario isn’t completely to blame however, as the console’s been overtaken by an army of bugs and glitches, meaning that it’s up to the titular anti-hero and his friends to set things right and escape from their digital prison.

Sections in between the microgames are filled with brief conversations that did make me chuckle on occasion, and even through these short moments the personality of each character does come through. Unfortunately, despite its set-up, the story mode doesn’t really amount to much other than simply introducing the player to the game’s mechanics, and the whole thing can be completed in just a few hours.

What can’t be faulted are the game’s graphics and character design. Because of its video game setting, Get it Together! turns the typical WarioWare crew into bite-sized versions of themselves with 8-bit underpinnings, albeit on a 3D model. That might sound odd, but the aesthetic sticks out in such a way that you just can’t keep your eyes off it.

Gameplay

  • Players now directly control WarioWare characters from a 2D perspective
  • Each character has a different way of handling micro-games
  • Added layer of challenge over previous games in the series

For almost every game in the WarioWare series, Nintendo has tried to implement a new mechanic to keep things feeling fresh, and Get it Together! is no different. Instead of having the player input be contextual to the particular microgame you’re playing, you now take direct control of the series’ characters – akin to a 2D side-scroller.

While that might not sound like a challenge at first, be aware that each character controls differently and so they can all approach the same microgame from a completely…



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